itwasjustaphase:

pippinstewardofgondor:

inebriatedpony:

Science!

what the fuck is this science bullshit

Fuckin’, chemistry, and physics, and all that good shit.

(Source: randomweas)

Reblogged from profoundbandit with 304,274 notes / science 

nightmareeps:

WHO WAS THE IDIOT WHO PASSED UP THE CHANCE TO CALL ASTRONOMERS “SKYENTISTS”

(Source: neptunain)

crownedrose:

“Fire Rainbows” (Circumhorizontal Arcs) & Cloud Iridescence

These phenomenons are and can be uncommon (especially depending on your location) and bloody cool! Like moon and sun halos, they work basically the same way: clouds in the atmosphere have ice crystals and water droplets that cause diffraction and scatter the light when the sun is at just the right angle. Circumhorizontal Arcs (aka “Fire Rainbows”) are more common than Cloud Iridescence, as the sun must be high in the sky for fire rainbows, which produce these massive halos that usually you can’t fully see due to your location or scattered clouds. Cloud Iridescence is with smaller crystals “closer” to the sun and in certain thin clouds. With that, classification of all these different phenomenons depends on the size of the crystals, degree of the sun (or moon), location (etc), giving us an awesome variety of atmospheric optical phenomenons to witness!

Photo credits for the above photos: not on your nelly, Pandiyan, colinjcampbell, Jeff Kubina, and Sean Stayte.

Reblogged from travelthirst with 3,276 notes / science rainbows 

the-star-stuff:

The Filipina who proved Einstein right
Meet  Reinabelle Reyes, a 28-year-old astrophysicist who astounded scientists all over the world when she proved Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity on a cosmic scale. That was when she was only 26.
Einstein’s theories have been verified many times, but it took Reyes and her Princeton University collaborators to verify his Theory of General Relativity, beyond the confines of our solar system.
Led by Reyes, the research team made headlines back in 2010 when they showed how galaxies up to 3.5 billion light years away are clustered together in exactly the way General Relativity predicts. They came up with a new astronomical measurement, which indicates how galaxies are pulled together by gravity, just as Einstein theorized.
Her findings also support the existence of Dark Energy—a force greater than gravity once merely imagined by scientists. This is a big deal, because, even NASA tells us, pinning down the exact properties of Dark Energy is among the most significant problems facing science today. According to the NASA website, Dark Energy “is the deepest mystery in physics, and its resolution is likely to greatly advance our understanding of matter, space, and time.”
Reinabelle Reyes is among the scientists involved in unraveling this profound mystery.
READ MORE!!!!

the-star-stuff:

The Filipina who proved Einstein right

Meet  Reinabelle Reyes, a 28-year-old astrophysicist who astounded scientists all over the world when she proved Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity on a cosmic scale. That was when she was only 26.

Einstein’s theories have been verified many times, but it took Reyes and her Princeton University collaborators to verify his Theory of General Relativity, beyond the confines of our solar system.

Led by Reyes, the research team made headlines back in 2010 when they showed how galaxies up to 3.5 billion light years away are clustered together in exactly the way General Relativity predicts. They came up with a new astronomical measurement, which indicates how galaxies are pulled together by gravity, just as Einstein theorized.

Her findings also support the existence of Dark Energy—a force greater than gravity once merely imagined by scientists. This is a big deal, because, even NASA tells us, pinning down the exact properties of Dark Energy is among the most significant problems facing science today. According to the NASA website, Dark Energy “is the deepest mystery in physics, and its resolution is likely to greatly advance our understanding of matter, space, and time.”

Reinabelle Reyes is among the scientists involved in unraveling this profound mystery.

READ MORE!!!!

Reblogged from lilybaeum with 3,704 notes / science! science 

shadowfawn:

childofthegoddess:

violent-buddhist:

The Quietest Place on Earth Will Drive You Insane Within 45 Minutes
There’s a small room in Minnesota thatblocks out 99% of all external sound. That’s an impressive number! Also impressive: nobody can take more than 45 minutes alone in the room before they go nuts.
The Daily Mail describes Orfield Labs’ anechoic chamber—perfect for making extremely sensitive audio measurements. But also perfect for sending you into a hallucinatory hell so hellacious you’ll need a chair:
‘When it’s quiet, ears will adapt. The quieter the room, the more things you hear. You’ll hear your heart beating, sometimes you can hear your lungs, hear your stomach gurgling loudly. ‘In the anechoic chamber, you become the sound.’ And this is a very disorientating experience. Mr Orfield explained that it’s so disconcerting that sitting down is a must. He said: ‘How you orient yourself is through sounds you hear when you walk. In the anechnoic chamber, you don’t have any cues. You take away the perceptual cues that allow you to balance and manoeuvre. If you’re in there for half an hour, you have to be in a chair.’
That sounds swell. Just the serene quiet of you, your thoughts, and the unceasing pounding of the human heart. Your brain can’t take it, apparently, and begins to fabricate sounds that aren’t really there—completely delusional noises meant to block out the churning of your own horrid biomass.
(Source)

Best place for meditation lol

I was thinking the same thing lololol.
Also, I bet a deaf person could handle that room. 

shadowfawn:

childofthegoddess:

violent-buddhist:

The Quietest Place on Earth Will Drive You Insane Within 45 Minutes


There’s a small room in Minnesota thatblocks out 99% of all external sound. That’s an impressive number! Also impressive: nobody can take more than 45 minutes alone in the room before they go nuts.

The Daily Mail describes Orfield Labs’ anechoic chamber—perfect for making extremely sensitive audio measurements. But also perfect for sending you into a hallucinatory hell so hellacious you’ll need a chair:

‘When it’s quiet, ears will adapt. The quieter the room, the more things you hear. You’ll hear your heart beating, sometimes you can hear your lungs, hear your stomach gurgling loudly. ‘In the anechoic chamber, you become the sound.’ And this is a very disorientating experience. Mr Orfield explained that it’s so disconcerting that sitting down is a must. He said: ‘How you orient yourself is through sounds you hear when you walk. In the anechnoic chamber, you don’t have any cues. You take away the perceptual cues that allow you to balance and manoeuvre. If you’re in there for half an hour, you have to be in a chair.’

That sounds swell. Just the serene quiet of you, your thoughts, and the unceasing pounding of the human heart. Your brain can’t take it, apparently, and begins to fabricate sounds that aren’t really there—completely delusional noises meant to block out the churning of your own horrid biomass.

(Source)

Best place for meditation lol

I was thinking the same thing lololol.

Also, I bet a deaf person could handle that room. 

Reblogged from omgitsrihannaloljk with 52,329 notes / science 

"[Science and art] ask the same questions. Science addresses - really what it does at its best is force us to reassess our place in the cosmos. Where do we come from? Who are we? Where are we going? And those are the very same questions that you get in art, literature, music. Every time you read a wonderful book or see a wonderful film, you come out of it with a different perspective of yourself, and too often, it seems to me, we forget that cultural aspect of science."

Physicist Laurence Krauss discusses the connection of science and art – a connection we’ve previously explored – with novelist Cormac McCarthy, filmmaker Werner Herzog, and NPR’s Ira Flatow.

Jonah Lehrer calls this convergence of art and science “a fourth culture of knowledge” and argues it’s essential for a thriving society.

(via explore-blog)

Reblogged from explore-blog with 122 notes / quotes science art 

csebastian:

Epigenetics, by Matthew Forsythe

csebastian:

Epigenetics, by Matthew Forsythe

Reblogged from csebastian with 15,293 notes / dna science knitting 

explore-blog:

“Hydrogen is an odorless colorless gas which, given enough time, turns into people.” 
Designer Schuhle Lewis says:

A good poster for: Physicists and Scientists
A bad poster for: Creationists
Based on a quote by Edward R Harrison, found here.

(↬ It’s Okay To Be Smart)

explore-blog:

“Hydrogen is an odorless colorless gas which, given enough time, turns into people.” 

Designer Schuhle Lewis says:

A good poster for: Physicists and Scientists

A bad poster for: Creationists

Based on a quote by Edward R Harrison, found here.

( It’s Okay To Be Smart)

Reblogged from explore-blog with 177 notes / hydrogen science! science 

mapmeoblivion:

Glass Microbiology by Luke Jerram

explore-blog:

NASA astronauts demonstrate a water bubble bursting at zero gravity. Filmed on VHS in 1996.